coaching
manager September 10, 2016 No Comments

You are a busy manager.

You have 100 and 1 things to do and your inbox is getting fuller as you read this.

Everybody needs to talk to you, you are literally going from one meeting to the next.

All you really want to do is sit and take stock, re-connect with your team who you haven’t really ‘seen’ for weeks and feel like you are impacting someone positively, rather than just doing, doing, doing and going from one issue to the next.

Sound familiar?

I often hear this when I am facilitating my Coaching Others workshops and having been in the same position myself a few years ago, I really empathise with managers today. There is never enough time to do everything.

What is really encouraging though is that managers WANT to coach; they want to do more of it because they see results from it, they know the value it brings to the individual, to them as the Manager and to the organisation.

There is a frustration with coaching though when the individual doesn’t respond positively, the conversation is hard to manage or the coach is doing all the work.

This is easily remedied and I have the answer.

It basically comes down to understanding the Will and Skill of the intended Coachee. You need to choose your coachee wisely because not everybody is ready for coaching. Max Landsberg introduced the Skill/Will matrix in his book, ‘The Tao of Coaching’ and for me it should used by the Manager at the beginning of every coaching process to ensure their time is being used wisely.

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It guides the manager to think of their potential coachee and plot them on a matrix. The matrix has 2 dimensions, Skill and Will. If the coachee has the skill but not the will to develop then they need to be re-energised and excited about the potential and value that coaching can bring to them. On the other hand, if the coachee is lacking the will and the skill then more direction is required, maybe it’s performance management, maybe they are in the wrong job.

Coaching is ideal for people who have the will but necessarily the skill – they want to improve, they have the desire and most importantly they have the potential to do more.

These coachees are worth the investment of your limited time and energy.